Saturday, January 3, 2009

1.20.5


Danveld began to relate the story of Zlotoryja: how during the restoration of the castle, the duke and his court were captured, and how during the fight Danusia’s mother died. He told how Jurand avenged his wife in terrible ways on all the Knights of the Cross. Danveld's hatred was apparent during the narration, because he also had some personal reasons for hating Jurand. Two years before, during an encounter with Jurand, the mere sight of that dreadful man, called by some "the Boar of Spychow", so terrified him for the first time in his life that he deserted his two relatives and his retinue, and fled in panic to Szczytno. For this cowardly act the Grand Master of the Order brought suit against him in the knightly court. After he swore that his horse had become unmanageable and had carried him away from the battlefield he was declared innocent, but that incident shut the door for him to all higher positions in the Order.

Of course Danveld did not say anything about that incident to De Lorche, but instead he complained bitterly about Jurand's atrocities and the audacity of all Poles. At some point the Lotaringer could not comprehend it anymore and said:

"But we are in the country of the Mazurs and not the Poles."

"It is an independent principality but the same nation," answered the komtur. "They feel the same hatred against the Order. May God permit the German swords to exterminate all this race!"

"You are right, sir. I never heard even among the heathen of such an unlawful deed, as the building of a castle on somebody else's land, as this duke tried to do," said de Lorche.

"He built the castle against us, but Zlotoryja is situated on his land, not on ours."

"Then glory be to Christ that he granted you the victory! What was the result of the war?"

"There was no war back then."

"And your victory at Zlotoryja?"

"God favored us. The duke had no army with him, only his court and the women."

Here de Lorche looked at the Knight with amazement.

"What? During the time of peace you attacked the women and the duke, who was building a castle on his own land?"

"For the glory of the Order and of Christendom the are no bad deeds."

"And that dreadful knight is seeking vengeance for the death of his young wife, killed by you during the time of peace?"

"Whoever raises his hand against a Knight of the Cross, is a son of darkness."

Hearing this Sir de Lorche became thoughtful but he did not have time to answer Danveld, because they arrived at a large, snow-covered glade in the woods, on which the prince and others dismounted.

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